DisplayLink opens Seattle office


08-04-2008

DisplayLink today announced that it has opened a new office in Seattle. The office will serve as a base for network display software development, while supporting projects with area partners such as Microsoft and Intel.

DisplayLink offers unique opportunities for Seattle software engineers. Unlike the region’s many Web 2.0 startups, DisplayLink is a venture-financed, pre-IPO startup that sells both chips and software. Its technology is already widely available in products from Samsung, Toshiba, LG, Kensington, Belkin, and many other leading brands.

"The key to continuing DisplayLink's impressive growth is finding creative, capable, and forward-thinking software talent to match our hardware innovations in USB display technologies," said Bernie Thompson, vice president of software platforms at DisplayLink. "Seattle is a hot spot for this kind of talent, and DisplayLink hopes to attract the same level of high-quality personnel that has made world leaders out of companies such as Microsoft, Google and Amazon."

DisplayLink's Seattle office will be headed up by Bernie Thompson, who has worked on the leading edge of software development for over 15 years. He was previously a Software Development Manager at Microsoft, responsible for the core USB and Bluetooth teams. Among his diverse professional roles, Thompson has served as President of the Linux division at Applix, as the Microsoft engineering liaison for the graphics chip maker S3, and on the OS/2 development team at IBM.

About DisplayLink
DisplayLink Corp. is a network display chip and software company that helps people to create simple connections between computers and displays – via USB, making the benefits of expanded visual workspace available to everyone. Using universally accepted wired or wireless networking protocols and proprietary software compression techniques, graphically rich content can be transmitted easily between a single device and multiple displays over a network. Leading global manufacturers have integrated network display technology into an array of consumer electronics including USB-enabled monitors, video docking stations and display adapters. More information can be found at www.displaylink.com.


 

DisplayLink is a fabless network graphics semiconductor and software company, formed in 2003 to develop and exploit methods of delivering content to multiple flat panel displays from a single computer with the view that this technology could lower the costs of computing and thus make information technology much more widely available in developing countries.

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